It’s a short stroll from the Poolhouse to the rear of the Main House, which overlooks the meadows. The foundation of the house dates to the 18th century and the home’s current appearance is c.1840. Variously known as “Our House,” the “Innkeeper’s House” and the “Faculty Building,” it served as the primary residence for the village’s many owners during the second Spa era (1781-1865), the administrators of both the Soldiers’ Orphans School (1869-1912) and the PA Academy of the Fine Arts Country School (1916-1952), and the owner of Good News Productions (1952-1974). The garage was formerly a utility building and power plant.

After the purchase of the village by Historic Yellow Springs in 1974, this house and one other property were sold to private individuals for restoration. Following a major capital campaign, the organization re-purchased the property in 1997. It is now also known as the Rosato House in honor of a major donor. Today it is still used as a residence.

“The “object” of the Academy is to give open-air instruction in the fine arts and especially in the painting and drawing of landscape and to establish an artists’ colony where artists can help each other – thereby affording a splendid opportunity for art students and artists as well.”

John Andrews Myers, secretary of the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, announcing to members that “the open-air school
and artists’ colony” was open for their inspection, spring 1918.

The restored Main House viewed from the Lincoln Building porch.

The restored Main House viewed from the Lincoln Building porch.

 

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1930's portrait class with "farmer" model in doorway of garage.

1930’s portrait class with “farmer” model in doorway of garage.