Continue your stroll across the street and down the steps to the west meadows. In Sept. 1777 General Washington and his troops camped beside the creek in these meadows and during both Spa eras (1722-1777 and 1781-1865) they were dotted with bathhouses for visitors coming to the village to “partake of the waters.”

Of the two remaining bathhouses, the gazebo was built in the 1830’s to house the property’s iron spring. The gazebo has come to symbolize Historic Yellow Springs and is the organization’s logo. The other structure, now known as the Poolhouse, was built in 1839 and served as a bathhouse until the Soldiers’ Orphans School turned it into a laundry. It was modified to its present appearance in 1921 by the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts and contains an open-air spring-fed swimming pool and changing rooms. Today’s visitors enjoy outdoor activities in the meadows just as much as the thousands of visitors preceding them.

“Were the efforts of Art combined with those of Nature, and regulated by the dictates of an improved taste, this highly favoured place would burst upon the enraptured traveler with all the potent charms of magic or enchantment. The bath which is most inviting and consequently most used, is situated in a beautiful vale opposite to, and about two hundred and twenty feet from, the mansion house, at the extremity of a grove of lofty beach trees…”

From a series on American Scenery in The Port Folio, 1810.

Annual Herb Sale in the Poolhouse Meadow.

Annual Herb Sale in the Poolhouse Meadow.

Painting class at the Gazebo in the Iron Spring Meadow, 1938.

Painting class at the Gazebo in the Meadow, 1938.

Winter view of the Poolhouse and Gazebo, mid-1950's.

Winter view of the Poolhouse and Gazebo, mid-1950’s.