EvAngelos Frudakis 1921 – 2019

  EvAngelos Frudakis 1921 – 2019 EvAngelos Frudakis, a major figure in the world of 20th-century sculpture and resident of Philadelphia, died Feb. 16, 2019 at the age of 97. Mr. Frudakis had a strong influence in the field of sculpture through his monumental public works as well as through his teaching and mentoring. Recipient of the Medal of Honor for lifetime achievement by the National Sculpture Society, Mr. Frudakis is best known for his sculptures The Minuteman, installed at the National Guard Building in Washington, DC; The Signer in Independence Hall, Philadelphia; Fishing Bear at the Philadelphia Zoo; Reaching, a bronze female nude in the Brookgreen Gardens Sculpture Museum, Myrtle Beach, SC; and Icarus and Daedalus, a bronze fountain at the Central Arkansas Library, Little Rock, AR. EvAngelos Frudakis working on his sculpture The Signer.Chester Springs Studio was a special place to Mr. Frudakis, who was awarded a scholarship and attended the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts (PAFA) in the 1940s. He attended the Academy’s country school in Chester Springs in 1941-1942, and after WWII, continued his studies from 1945-1949. Mr. Frudakis called Chester Springs “a Shangri-la” and said the Sculpture Barn “was like a cathedral, with great north light—the three-dimensional lighting that you needed.” In 2016, Mr. Frudakis returned to  Chester Springs for an interview at Historic Yellow Springs, and to revisit sites used by the Academy. Mr. Frudakis studied with Academy instructor Walker Hancock, a noted sculptor who became known as one of the “Monuments Men,” a group of artists that recovered art treasures looted by the Nazis. He also studied with Harry Rosen and Charles Rudy, teachers at the Academy and Amadeo Merli, a...

Tribute to Bob Momyer, 1940 – 2019

Tribute to Bob Momyer 1940 – 2019 With heavy hearts, we share the very sad news of the passing of one of HYS’s great champions, Robert “Bob” Momyer, and offer our deepest condolences to his wife Sandy, the current Moore Archivist here at HYS and our Executive Director from 1986 until 2001. Sandy and Bob made an amazing team, were a great couple, and for some twenty years were the heart and soul of our organization. On behalf of the Board of Directors, and the many others like me who had the pleasure of working with Bob, I offer our deepest respect and gratitude for the unparalleled service he provided our organization. As my friend and fellow Board Member Mark Ashton wrote, in the flurry of email remembrances we’ve all been sharing since we heard the news, “Bob’s contributions were not derivative of Sandy’s, but stood on their own”. In his day, Bob volunteered for just about every event we had; was a stalwart First Gentleman when Sandy was Executive Director, served on more committees than I can count (including doing our press releases and advertising), was a tour guide, served several terms as a Board Member and as Vice President of our Board. Bob and I created the HYS Halloween event together, in conjunction with fellow Board Member Bob Willson. That was just one of the many roles he played at HYS over many years, but one that is particularly special to me. For five years we haunted the village together, scaring and exciting area children, while sneaking in a little history along the way. I’ll always remember...